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BackTrack Bootable BT BT 4 BT4 Linux Passwords Ubuntu UNetbootin USB Utility VMWare WEP Windows WPA

How to make Backtrack 4 boot from USB

In this article we will describe how we can make a USB Bootable drive for Backtrack 4 Linux distribution. The new release is based on Debian/Ubuntu and not on Slackware as it was used to be in earlier versions (Backtrack 3 and below).

In this article the UNetbootin Windows version tool has been used to demonstrate the above scenario.

Requirements:
Minimum USB Drive capacity 1 GB
Format the USB to FAT32

Tools:
http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/
http://www.remote-exploit.org/cgi-bin/fileget?version=bt4-beta-iso

Workaround:

1. Download BT4 Beta ISO
2. Download UNetbootin to make our usb bootable
3. Run Unetbootin and select bt4-beta.iso for diskimage
4. Select USB Drive letter and click on OK to start making a bootable usb drive

After the creation process finishes restart your machine and boot from the new usb bootable drive created and enjoy Backtrack 4 Beta on your system.

Default Backtrack 4 username is root and password is toor.

Note: Be sure that your install the MBR on the USB drive by executing drive:bootbootinst.bat on your USB drive.

Keywords:

backtrack 4 usb thumb drive bootable
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how to make bt4 bootable from usb

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BackTrack BT Google Hard Drive Install Linux Partition Remote-Exploit Ubuntu VMWare WEP Windows WPA

Installing Backtrack 3 to a harddrive

I started with a clean drive, so you might have to manipulate your partition tables. I’m going to assume that you’re comfortable working with partition tables. If not, work on your googleing.

Here are the steps I took to install Backtrack 3 on to my laptop harddrive.

1. Boot system from Backtrack 3 CD.
2. Once booted, open a terminal and type; cfdisk
3. Re-configure your partitions. I made several; / , /boot, /var, /tmp, /home, swap. Be sure to set your / or /boot partition to be bootable.
4. When your changes are complete, use the write option and type YES to confirm the changes.
5. Reboot, booting from the Backtrack 3 CD again.
6. When the system restarts, open a terminal and enter preform the following;

bt~# mkswap /dev/sda5
bt~# swapon /dev/sda5

This formats and enables swap space. You’ll need this later
7. Create directories needed to mount up the partitions you just created. I used the following;

bt~# mkdir -p /mnt/backtrack/{boot,home,tmp,var}

8. Now format and mount the partitions you created earlier in steps 1-4. I used the following commands;

bt~# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda6
bt~# mount /dev/sda6 /mnt/backtrack/
bt~# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda7
bt~# mount /dev/sda7/mnt/backtrack/var
bt~# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda8
bt~# mount /dev/sda8 /mnt/backtrack/tmp
bt~# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda9
bt~# mount /dev/sda9 /mnt/backtrack/home

9. Once all targets are mounted, use the following command to copy the live cd to your harddrive;

cp –preserve -R /{bin,dev,pentest,root,usr,etc,lib,opt,sbin}

10. Create additional directories

bt~# mkdir /mnt/backtrack/{mnt,proc,sys,tmp}

11. Mount up /mnt/backtrack/dev

bt~# mount –bind /dev /mnt/backtrack/dev

12. Mount slash proc!

bt~# mount -t proc proc /mnt/backtrack/proc

13. Copy our Linux Kernel into place

bt~# cp /boot/vmlinuz /mnt/backtrack/boot

14. Use choot to your new Backtrack 3 installation.

bt~# chroot /mnt/backtrack /bin/bash

15. Edit /etc/lilo.conf

bt~# nano /etc/lilo.conf

and ensure both the boot and root reflect your local installation. I used options similar to the following;

boot /dev/sda
root /dev/sda5

16. When your changes are complete, write the file and exit nano.
17. Install lilo on /dev/sda

bt~# lilo -v

18. Almost done! Edit /etc/fstab to reflect your partition layout. It should be pretty simple to copy and modify existing entries. Check and double check. If this file is wrong, your system may not boot.
19. Once done, exit your chrooted environment

bt~# exit

20. Reboot! Remove the CD from the drive. If everything has gone properly, your system should boot Backtrack 3. I had to login as root and use the startx command to start KDE.

BackTrack links

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BackTrack BT BT4 HD HDD ISO Linux Ubuntu VMWare WEP Windows WPA

HowTo: Backtrack 4 (Beta) Hard Drive Installation

UPDATE: See BackTrack 4 Pre-Release Hard Disk Install for updated instructions for the newer BackTrack 4 Beta.

Backtrack 4 does not contain an installer, so we wrote this step by step guide based on muts cookbook on how to install Backtrack 4 on our hard disk drive.

Step 1 – Creating the partitions
First we will need to create three partitions to be able to install backtrack on our hard disk drive. We will need boot, swap and root partitions to be created. (We can still create 2 partitions and install the boot inside the root partition)

fdisk /dev/sda

Creating the partitions

Enter ‘n‘ for new partition.
Enter ‘p‘ for primary.
Partition number ‘1‘.
Press Enter to accept default First cylinder.
Enter Size: ‘+256M

Enter ‘n‘ for new partition.
Enter ‘p‘ for primary.
Partition number ‘2‘.
Press Enter to accept default First cylinder.
Enter Size: ‘+1024M

Enter ‘n‘ for new partition.
Enter ‘p‘ for primary.
Partition number ‘3‘.
Press Enter to accept default First cylinder.
Enter Size: ‘+32G‘ NOTE: I used 32GB, you can use a size you prefer.

NOTES:
– Select ‘p’ to print the partition table and verify newly created partitions.

Type ‘w‘ to write changes and exit fdisk.

Activate Boot Partition & Specify Swap

Step 2 – Format the file systems
I formated my file system with mkreiserfs for root partition, ext2 for boot and swap for the swap partition.

mkfs.ext2 /dev/sda1

prepare swap using:

mkswap /dev/sda2
swapon /dev/sda2

mkfs.reiserfs /dev/sda3

Step 3 – Mount and Copy Directories

Now its time to copy over the backtrack files to the hard drive and configure it to run the backtrack on boot.

Mount and Copy the Directory Structure using:

mkdir /mnt/bt4
mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/bt4/
mkdir /mnt/bt4/boot
mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/bt4/boot/
cp –preserve -R /{bin,dev,home,pentest,root,usr,boot,etc,lib,opt,sbin,var} /mnt/bt4/
mkdir /mnt/bt4/{mnt,tmp,proc,sys}
chmod 1777 /mnt/bt4/tmp/
mount -t proc proc /mnt/bt4/proc/
mount -o bind /dev /mnt/bt4/dev/
chroot /mnt/bt4/ /bin/bash

NOTE: The copy operation will take some time so be patient until it finish

Step 4 – Configure Bootloader

nano /etc/lilo.conf

We will need to configure /etc/lilo.conf and define the boot and root partition so we will be able to boot into backtrack. In case we do not correctly define the root partition we will get an error “Kernel panic: no init found”.

Configure fstab

Edit /etc/fstab and append the following lines:

/dev/sda3 / reiserfs defaults 0 0 # AutoUpdate
/dev/sda2 none swap sw 0 0

Execute lilo -v

NOTE: lilo may not be installed, if not make sure you are connected to the Internet (use ifconfig to view IP address, etc., and dhclient to renew IP address if necessary). Once connected run the following to install lilo.

apt-get install lilo

You will receive the message, “LILO configuration
It seems to be your first LILO installation. It is absolutely necessary to run liloconfig(8) when you complete this process and execute /sbin/lilo after this.
LILO won’t work if you don’t do this.

So, select OK then run liloconfig, then /sbin/lilo. If you get the message, “fatal: cannot open: /etc/lilo.conf” you are basically screwed and need to search for a solution.

Execute lilo -v and reboot

Reference: http://www.offensive-security.com/documentation/bt4install.pdf

BackTrack links

Keywords:

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bt4 manual
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Categories
BackTrack BT Google Linux Security Ubuntu VMWare WEP Windows WPA

Installing Backtrack 3 to a harddrive

I started with a clean drive, so you might have to manipulate your partition tables. I’m going to assume that you’re comfortable working with partition tables. If not, work on your google-fu.

Here are the steps I took to install Backtrack 3 on to my laptop harddrive

1. Boot system from Backtrack 3 CD.

2. Once booted, open a terminal and type cfdisk

3. Create these 3 partitons:

A. sda1=/boot
B. sda2=swap
C. sda3= /

NOTE: Format A and C using mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda1 and mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda3.

4. Boot your live CD and open a bash shell and begin. If your swap is not yet made then do this..(otherwise omit this step)

bt~# mkswap /dev/sda2
bt~# swapon /dev/sda2

5. Starting installation

bt~# mkdir /mnt/backtrack
bt~# mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/backtrack/
bt~# mkdir /mnt/backtrack/boot/
bt~# mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/backtrack/boot/

(note: If you only have one partiton to install backtrack to simply omit this step)

bt~# cp –preserve -R /{bin,dev,pentest,usr,etc,lib,opt,sbin,var,root} /mnt/backtrack/
bt~# mkdir /mnt/backtrack/{mnt,proc,sys,tmp,boot,root}
bt~# mount –bind /dev/ /mnt/backtrack/dev/
bt~# mount -t proc proc /mnt/backtrack/proc/
bt~# cp /boot/vmlinuz /mnt/backtrack/boot/

6. Now for lilo.

bt~# chroot /mnt/backtrack/ /bin/bash
bt~# nano /etc/lilo.conf

7. Now I like to delete all the BS in the lilo config file so here is what mine would look like. (remember to set your own VGA accordingly )

lba32
boot /dev/sda
prompt
timeout=60
change-rules
reset
vga=791
image = /boot/vmlinuz
root = /dev/sda3
label = backtrack3_final

GRUB users (Thanks to drwalter)

title Backtrack 3 KDE
rootnoverify (hd0,2)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz vga=791 root=/dev/sda3 ro autoexec=xconf;kdm
boot

title Backtrack 3
rootnoverify (hd0,2)
kernel /boot/vmlinuz vga=791 root=/dev/sda3 ro
boot

REMEMBER: hd0,2 would be for partition 3 NOT 2. Change accordingly!

Excellent. Save that and then execute lilo (I like to use the verbose flag)

bt~# lilo -v

after that exit your chroot enviorment

bt~# exit

and reboot and cross your fingers

bt~# reboot

BackTrack links
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BackTrack BackTrack 4 BT BT 4 Linux SSH Ubuntu VMWare WEP WPA

BT4 Install: Simplest way to install BackTrack4

Remote-exploit and BackTrack released the public Beta of BackTrack 4 the second week of February. As soon as this news came out, all sorts of people were on its download spree.  Within 5 days the download count reached 49,000+ for ISO and 17,000+ for the VMWare image.

As BT4 is still in its (pre release) Beta phase a lot of packages are missing, especially VoIP and Services sections. So you will need to manually start and control the services like sshd, vnc etc.  One more prominent change you should note is DHCP configurations and dhcp client (dhcpcd) are deliberately removed from startup script. BackTrack 4 starts in runlevel 2 where networking is disabled.

For BackTrack 4 the team introduced a new shell called “Debian Almquist Shell (Dash)” and /bin/sh is now a symlink to /bin/dash. It looks like “dash” shell does not support most of the semantics of legacy bash shell. As per wikipedia – Dash is a direct descendant of the NetBSD version of the Almquist Shell (ash).

Installing BackTrack needs at least 4 GB of free space on Hard drive. BT4 Beta has foot print of 856 MB without having voip packages. It could easily reach 1 GB mark in the future. So Make sure you have enough hard disk space before starting installation.

Go to the PowerCram HowTo: Backtrack 4 (Pre Release) Hard Drive Installation or BackTrack 4 Beta Hard Disk Install.

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Linux VMWare

Run Backtrack 3 in Windows with VMWare

This is a tutorial on how to run Backtrack 3 in windows using VMWare workstation.